Taiwan Doctors Eye Blockchain to Track Covid-19 Vaccination

1 month ago 10
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The blockchain-based platform will help keep a record of a patient’s jab history, side effects, and other health conditions.

A group of Taiwanese doctors and engineers have teamed up to develop a blockchain platform they hope will be used to track the vaccination history of Covid-19, according to the Asian news outlet Forkast.News.

The blockchain-based platform will provide the technology needed to securely store and track the vaccination history of patients.

The platform will also help track patients’ recorded side effects as well as other health conditions, said Albert C. Yang, the director of National Yang-Ming Chiao Tung University’s Digital Medicine Centre.

According to Yang, plans are underway to have the project roll out across hospitals, with the local governments expected to offer the required regulatory approval.

While the project looks set to improve the overall tracking of jab histories amid large-scale vaccination, one likely setback regards the collection of raw data in a unified format.

Data shows that 1.62 million Taiwanese, or about 6.7% of the population, had received at least one shot of the vaccine by 21 June. That’s quite a small percentage given the population stands at around 25.6 million people. The country recently received 2.5 million doses from the US, with authorities seeking to cover as many people as possible.

Blockchain is increasingly playing a crucial role in the vaccination program. The technology currently helps vaccine manufacturers, distributors and providers track the shipment, storage and administration to ensure safety and guard against counterfeits.

Earlier this month, blockchain platform VXPASS unveiled its Digital Covid Card for global use, allowing medical practitioners and the public to manage, store and verify jab records from anywhere in the world. The Bitcoin SV (BSV) blockchain-powered application allows patients to share their vaccination records on-chain without exposing any personal data.

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